Click here to help us improve the Global Witness site by taking part in our brief survey.

Report

Global Witness responds to HAGL’s claims over inaccuracy of Rubber Barons report

20th May 2013
Global Witness understands that Hoang Anh Gia Lai (HAGL) CEO Doan Nguyen Duc held a press conference during which the company contested evidence in Global Witness’ report ‘Rubber Barons’. This report highlights how the company’s rubber plantations in Cambodia and Laos are violating laws and contributing to environmental and human rights abuses.

Global Witness understands that Hoang Anh Gia Lai (HAGL) CEO Doan Nguyen Duc held a press conference during which the company contested evidence in Global Witness’ report ‘Rubber Barons’. This report highlights how the company’s rubber plantations in Cambodia and Laos are violating laws and contributing to environmental and human rights abuses.

Logging in the shadows: how vested interests abuse shadow permits to evade forest sector reforms

30th April 2013

Systematic abuse of small, poorly regulated logging permits in Africa by companies, forest officials and politicians is undermining efforts to fight deforestation and keep illegal timber out of the EU, says a new report by Global Witness.

Transparency Matters: Disclosure of payments to governments by Chinese extractive companies

15th January 2013
Transparency Matters: Disclosure of payments to governments by Chinese extractive companies presents a rigorous assessment of the tax payments made by Shanghai-listed extractive companies to governments in resource-rich countries in 2010 and 2011. It finds that while several companies positively stand out in the amount and quality of information they publish, much more could be done by the companies and regulators to enhance reporting beyond existing requirements.

简体中文

Click here to read the press release.

Blueprint for Prosperity: How South Sudan's new laws hold the key to a transparent and accountable oil sector

29th November 2012
With independence on 9 July 2011, the Republic of South Sudan became both the newest and the most oil-dependent country in the world. South Sudan has been blessed with oil wealth that, if managed responsibly, could provide for the long-term development and prosperity its citizens deserve. There are encouraging signs that the South Sudanese government is committed to ensuring this outcome. Indeed, the country’s emerging legal framework includes wide-ranging public reporting, contract allocation, and revenue management standards that draw from international best practice. However, implementation of these transparency and accountability measures will not be easy. It will require a concerted effort and prioritisation from across the government. It will also demand a genuine commitment to move beyond the legacy of closed-door oil sector management left by the country’s former rulers in Khartoum. Now is the time for action. The purpose of this report is to provide an analysis of South Sudan’s new oil legislation, the commitments that have been made to transparency and accountability, the challenges for implementation, and the institutional, reporting, and auditing gaps which remain.

With independence on 9 July 2011, the Republic of South Sudan became both the newest and the most oil-dependent country in the world.

In the future, there will be no forests left

2nd November 2012

Click here to read the press release

HSBC has bankrolled logging companies causing widespread environmental destruction and human rights abuses in Sarawak, Malaysia, violating its sustainability policies and earning around US$130 million in the process, this investigation reveals. The bank is also providing financial services to companies widely suspected of systematic bribery and corruption.

Global Witness's memo to Glencore's shareholders

9th May 2012
Glencore’s recent acquisitions of world class mining assets in the Democratic Republic of Congo have taken place amid opaque dealings involving the Congolese government, Glencore and its longstanding partner Dan Gertler, an Israeli businessman who is a close friend of President Joseph Kabila.

Secrecy surrounding Glencore’s business deals in DRC risks exposing shareholders to corrupt practices.

Click the link below to read the memo.

Global Witness's memo to ENRC's shareholders

12th June 2012
ENRC’s rapid acquisition of billions of dollars worth of mining assets in the Democratic Republic of Congo between September 2009 and July 2011 has been facilitated by the company’s apparent collusion with Dan Gertler, a businessman who is a friend of President Joseph Kabila.

ENRC must address corruption concerns in DRC and publish findings.

Click the link below to download the full memo.

New Congolese oil and mining codes must include strong measures on transparency, tenders and community rights

11th October 2012
As the Democratic Republic of Congo begins the process of revising its mining and oil codes, Global Witness has published its recommendations on how the codes could best ensure transparent and accountable management of these key sectors.

As the Democratic Republic of Congo begins the process of revising its mining and oil codes, Global Witness has published its recommendations on how the codes could best ensure transparent and accountable management of these key sectors.

Congo, a country two-thirds the size of western Europe, is hugely wealthy in minerals including copper, cobalt and diamonds. Vast areas of Congo are also gradually being opened to oil exploration, with the potential to transform the country’s economy but also posing serious environmental and corruption risks.

Coming clean: How supply chain controls can stop Congo's minerals trade fuelling conflict

30th May 2012

La version française

简体中文