We're redesigning the new Global Witness website. You can get a preview here

Briefing Document

Joint civil society letter to NATO on Afghanistan's extractives industry

15th May 2012

Ahead of the NATO Chicago Summit this month, Global Witness, Integrity Watch Afghanistan, and the Revenue Watch Institute have sent a joint civil society letter to Secretary General Rasmussen urging all NATO member countries to address the role Afghanistan’s extractives sector will play in stabilising the country over the next decade.

At Chicago, we are calling on NATO to:

Extractive sector transparency: Why the EU needs a strong set of rules

24th April 2012

Download the briefing: Extractive sector transparency: Why the EU needs a strong set of rules

THE PROBLEM:

Why the EITI Rules need to cover licensing: the case of the DR Congo

1st December 2011

Lire en français

In July and August 2011, news came out that state mining companies in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) Gécamines and Sodimico had sold stakes in four major mining sites without making the information public. There are several major concerns over the deals, notably:

Global Witness Submission to International Development Select Committee Inquiry on Tax and Development

29th February 2012
Global Witness' response to an International Development Select Committee Inquiry on Tax and Development. Our response highlights the need for disclosure of revenue payments in the extractive sector and for more information to be made available about the ultimate - or beneficial - owner of companies.

Global Witness' response to an International Development Select Committee Inquiry on Tax and Development. Our response highlights the need for disclosure of revenue payments in the extractive sector and for more information to be made available about the ultimate - or beneficial - owner of companies. 

Financial Times: US to probe Cobalt oil links in Angola

21st February 2012
US authorities have launched an investigation into Cobalt International Energy’s operations in Angola, where the Goldman Sachs-backed group is developing one of the world’s most promising oil frontiers.

By Tom Burgis in London

US authorities have launched an investigation into Cobalt International Energy’s operations in Angola, where the Goldman Sachs-backed group is developing one of the world’s most promising oil frontiers.

Houston-based Cobalt said in a regulatory filing on Tuesday that US regulators had issued notice of a formal probe in November following informal discussions about allegations of ties between its local partner in Angola and senior government officials in the oil-rich southern African nation.

Principles for Independent Monitoring of REDD (IM-REDD)

3rd June 2010

Governance is key to REDD+. Through internationally agreed principles, safeguards and standards, a roadmap for progress towards the good governance required for successful REDD+ will be developed. Importantly, it will be owned by the countries concerned. A clear conflict of interest exists if governments monitor their own performance. A set of 10 principles can be dervied from Independent Forest Monitoring, developed over the decade to address precisely this problem.

Submission to the Foreign Office Overseas Territories consultation

21st December 2011
This submission focuses on the role of the financial sector of the British Virgin Islands (BVI) in facilitating a possible loss in value of billions of dollars from state mining assets in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), a country that remains at the bottom of the UN’s Human Development Index and which is a significant recipient of UK aid. It was made by Global Witness and Tax Justice Network in response to the Foreign Office's consultation on the Overseas Territories.

This submission focuses on the role of the financial sector of the British Virgin Islands (BVI) in facilitating a possible loss in value of billions of dollars from state mining assets in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), a country that remains at the bottom of the UN’s Human Development Index and which is a significant recipient of UK aid. It was made by Global Witness and Tax Justice Network in response to the Foreign Office's consultation on the Overseas Territories. 

The need for resource transparency beyond the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative : Lessons Learned

6th December 2011
Over the next three years, Afghanistan will be awarding contracts for many of its valuable mineral and petroleum reserves. It is critical to Afghanistan’s future that access to these resources is managed carefully, with checks and balances in place to guard against corruption and conflict risks and to ensure that potential economic, social and environmental impacts are considered and addressed from the outset. Drawing on lessons from the experiences of Angola, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Nigeria, Global Witness has identified the key steps which should be taken before and as concessions are awarded to ensure that the Afghan government and its people truly benefit from these deals

Over the next three years, Afghanistan will be awarding contracts for many of its valuable mineral and petroleum reserves.  It is critical to Afghanistan’s future that access to these resources is managed carefully, with checks and balances in place to guard against corruption and conflict risks and to ensure that potential economic, social and environmental impacts are considered and addressed from the outset.

Why we are leaving the Kimberley Process - A message from Global Witness Founding Director Charmian Gooch

5th December 2011

Read the press release

External briefing on Safeguarding REDD+

30th November 2011
This briefing, carries out by consultant group LTS International, examines existing systems for ensuring that finance for the UN's Reducing Emissions through Deforestation and Degradation scheme, under which rich countries pay developing ones to preserve rather than harvest their forests, is used effectively and transparently, and outlines what still needs to be done to ensure this.

This briefing, carries out by consultant group LTS International, examines existing systems for ensuring that finance for the UN's Reducing Emissions through Deforestation and Degradation scheme, under which rich countries pay developing ones to preserve rather than harvest their forests, is used effectively and transparently, and outlines what still needs to be done to ensure this.

Read Global Witness briefing on this issue.