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Global Witness and UN-REDD

UN-REDD is a United Nations programme that assists developing countries to prepare and implement national strategies for REDD+.

Global Witness works with the UN-REDD programme to ensure that it protects forests and the livelihoods and rights of the people who depend on them, key elements in developing and implementing REDD+.

We push for good governance and social and environmental regulation, including robust monitoring and feedback, and for the people affected by forest policy to be involved in decision-making.

As of February 2011, donor countries including Norway, Denmark and Spain had pledged $112 million to UN-REDD. This money funds National Programmes in participating countries and global activities.

The programme began with nine pilot countries: Bolivia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Indonesia, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Tanzania, Viet Nam and Zambia. It is now expanding to fund programmes in other countries.

Policy Board

Global Witness was elected to the UN-REDD Policy Board and represents non-governmental organisations from developed countries. The Policy Board approves national REDD+ programmes proposed by developing country governments and allocates funding to support them.

We use this platform to call for attention to tackling illegality and corruption, ensuring REDD+ achieves its environmental goals and preventing negative impacts on local and forest-dependent people.

Documents relating to UN-REDD and more information on Global Witness’ role on the UN-REDD Policy Board can be found here.

The Policy Board is composed of donor and recipient countries, three UN agencies (the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation, the UN Environment Programme and the UN Development Programme) and representatives of civil society and indigenous peoples.

Before each Policy Board meeting, Global Witness reviews proposals submitted by countries for UN-REDD funding to support national REDD+ programmes. Our review looks at illegality and corruption, monitoring, transparency of financial flows and the level of participation in policymaking by those affected by forest policy.

The Policy Board meets 2 – 3 times a year to discuss National Programmes, new funding proposals, and its Global Programme.

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